Jim Fogleman

Professor

What I do

As a Professor, I teach the courses General Genetics and Biostatistics and do research in human forensic genetics.

Specialization(s)

Genetics; Biostatistics; Coral Reef Ecology

Professional Biography

Degrees, professional certificates:
1972 B.S., Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
1974 M.S., Zoology, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins
1979 Ph.D., Genetics, Cornell University, New York

Professional experience:
1978-80 N.I.H. (NRSA) Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson

1980-82 Research Associate, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson

1983 Visiting Assistant Professor, Section of Genetics and Development, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

1983-88 Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado

1988-94 Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado

1990 Visiting Associate Professor, Section of Genetics and Development, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

1994- Professor, Department of Biological Sciences,
Present University of Denver, Denver, Colorado

2000-01 Associate Chair, Department of Biological Sciences,
University of Denver, Denver, Colorado

2001-02 Interim Dean; Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and
Engineering; University of Denver, Denver, Colorado

2002-07 Dean; Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and
Engineering (which subsequently became Natural Sciences and Mathematics); University of Denver, Denver, Colorado
 

Degree(s)

  • BS, Biology, University of New Mexico
  • MS, Zoology, Colorado State University
  • Ph.D., Genetics, Cornell University

Licensure / Accreditations

  • Master Scuba Diver Trainer
  • Open Water Scuba Instructor

Professional Affiliations

  • Professional Association of Diving Instructors

Research

My current interests involve the relevance of cytochrome P450 polymorphism in forensic medicine and akathisia-related acts of violence. Violence and mortality caused by psychiatric drugs do not receive much attention from forensic medical examiners. Akathisia, the most dangerous adverse drug reaction reported for these drugs, is hardly known and seldom recognized within the forensic medical community. By using data from suicide epidemiology, medication as a cause of suicide, homicide and other violence has been accepted in legal cases. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system is primarily responsible for the metabolism of most psychoactive medication, including antidepressants. Diminishing mutations in these CYP genes, called polymorphisms, have an impact on the metabolism of these drugs and their half-lives. DNA tests for these enzyme-producing genes can now be used to predict toxicity and adverse drug reactions which produce akathisia. These reactions can be immediate or delayed. Cause and manner of death, as established by a coroner, have far reaching implications. Suicide committed while in a toxic state might be ruled an accident. Homicide, when committed involuntarily by a person affected by a prescribed medication, elicits a different legal defense than the same act committed by a mentally ill person. The correct diagnosis provides an accused person with a defense of “not guilty by reason of involuntary intoxication” or “non-insane automatism”. Thus, the interactions between drugs and these genes are crucially important in a medico-legal context.

Presentations

Fogleman, J., & Eikelenboom-Schieveld, S. (2016). Cytochrome P450, SSRI’s and Violence. Individualizing Medicine, Advancing Care Through Genomics. Rochester, Minnesota: Mayo Clinic.
Fogleman, J., Eikelenboom, S., & Lucire, Y. (2015). From personalized medicine to personalized justice: The promises of translational pharmacogenomics in the justice system. Pharmacogenetic assessment of three homicides. . 2015 APSA-ASCEPT. Hobart, Tasmania, Australia: The Australasian Pharmaceutical Science Association (APSA) and The Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologist (ASCEPT.
Fogleman, J., Eikelenboom-Schieveld, S., & Lucire, Y. (2016). The relevance of Cytochrome P450 Polymorphism in forensic medicine and akathisia-related violence and suicide. GPS 2016: “Goals, Purposes and Strategies for Prisoner and Staff Mental Wellbeing in Custody”. Fremantle, Western Australia: The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.